Brand Newsroom Podcast

For anyone who has a say in how companies are communicating.

/Brand Newsroom
Brand Newsroom 2017-07-19T21:41:42+00:00

Brand Newsroom 153: Just what is the state of SEO in 2017?

Search Engine Optimisation: Is it the magic sauce we need to add to our content to help us reach our audience? Or is it an old-fashioned dark art we no longer need to worry about?

To discuss the state of SEO in 2017, the BNR team is joined by someone who really knows his stuff, Lush’s Zubin Fitter.

Here are some key take-outs:

  • SEO is still important. But it has evolved a lot since the days of keyword stuffing. Google and other search engines are focused on quality, relevant content.
  • Optimising your content is the best way to make sure you turn up in search results (and that’s still something you really want to happen).
  • It’s important to use your keywords naturally. Not only does stuffing in keywords not work for your audience, it’s also not working for Google — which will penalise you.
  • Zubin says brands need to be true to their message, “because the more honest the message is, the more easily it will be consumed by your audience”.
  • Do a Google search ranking for keywords that are important to your business. See where you come up. If you’re not ranking highly, it’s time to do something about your SEO.
  • If you don’t know what keywords to use, Google has a free keyword planner. You can use that to work out the keywords relevant to your enterprise.
  • It pays to have a professional on your side. Find an SEO partner who knows their stuff so that when Google changes their algorithm, you have someone who knows what they’re doing who can help you out. Changes to Google’s algorithm can really affect your search rankings. You want to be awake to that.
  • Do an audit of your website. Start by looking at it on a mobile site. How does it look? If it’s not responsive, it’s time to update.
  • See what your competition is doing, but don’t necessarily copy them just because they’re ranking better than you. You still need your unique point-of-difference.

On My Desk

Sarah recommended the LinkedIn Company Pages Playbook

Zubin recommended this clever calendar device, Calendly

James, who is obsessed with passwords, suggested the Dashlane Password Manager

And Nic recommended not underestimating the value of good old-fashioned merchandise in spreading brand awareness.

Have you heard the one about…

Recently James, Sarah and Nic discussed the closure of King Content, and what it means for content marketing.

And here’s a discussion on how to choose a voice over artist.

Like what you’ve heard?

You can subscribe to Brand Newsroom (or leave us a review) on iTunes. You can follow us on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

By | August 16th, 2017|Categories: Brand Newsroom, Marketing|Tags: , , , , , |Comments Off on Brand Newsroom 153: Just what is the state of SEO in 2017?

Brand Newsroom 152: The death of King Content is not the death of content marketing

There was some big news in the content marketing space here in Australia last week. Less than two years after media monitoring and data firm iSentia bought Australia’s best-known content marketing agency, King Content, for A$48 million, the company has killed off the brand, closed its New York and Hong Kong offices, and cut its staff. What went wrong? And what does it mean for content marketing?

Here are some key take-outs:

  • It was always an odd fit for a profitable media monitoring company to buy a content marketing firm. While the purchase added legitimacy to the content marketing industry, iSentia never seemed to know what to do with their new toy. The demise of King Content has been a long time coming, as a result.
  • King Content was very focused on sales. What Sarah saw in the marketplace was a very aggressive agency that was always going to have trouble delivering on the services they’re selling. In content marketing the sale is the easy part but the delivery is hard. King Content was a great sales machine.

“It’s always easy in the beginning. Where the delivery becomes difficult is at seven months, and the second year, at the third year, at the fourth year. To keep that delivery going and to scale that business and to scale across regions and continents and to maintain it was always going to be difficult to do.”  — Sarah

  • What the failure proves is that running a content marketing agency is hard. You can’t mass-produce content. It’s a quality product. You have to look after your clientele. The strategy and the content have to be tailor-made.
  • There was also a huge turnover of staff at King Content.
  • Nic says, if you’re going to do content marketing, have a relationship with your agency; don’t have a transaction.
  • King Content’s demise does not mean content marketing agencies can’t succeed; it just takes collaboration between the service provider and the brand. Critics saying the model doesn’t work are ignoring the fact this is how modern marketing works — brands bring in agencies for their expertise and contacts.
  • When you’re creating content it is for your brand, so you need to have a partnership with your agency. You can’t “set and forget”. It’s a collaboration. It’s up to your brand to be involved and committed and work closely with your content marketing service provider.

Here are the links you might need

On My Desk

Have you heard the one about…

Recently Sarah and Nic found out the secret to a good voice over (and how making the wrong choice of voice can affect your business).

And here’s a discussion about the life span of a website: How often should you refresh your website’s look and functionality?

Like what you’ve heard?

 Please subscribe or leave us a review on iTunes.

By | August 9th, 2017|Categories: Brand Newsroom, Marketing|Tags: , |Comments Off on Brand Newsroom 152: The death of King Content is not the death of content marketing

Brand Newsroom 151: How important is a voice over?

The Brand Newsroom team is joined by experienced broadcaster and voice-over artist Alex Lush to talk about voice overs. BNR received an email from an avid Brand Newsroom listener, Brenda, who asked how important it was to get the right voice to do your voice over. It’s a great question, so we thought we’d ask the best voice in the business. Alex is also Lush Digital’s chief of staff.

Here are some key takeaways:

• Not just anybody can do a voice over and using the right voice-over artist is critical to your audio or video content’s success. With the wrong voice you can lose your audience immediately.
• Knowing how to do a good voice over takes practice, often some training, and certainly an ability to act.
• Brands pick voice-over artists who are a reflection of their brand. Their voice and voice over should appeal to the target demographic.
• If you’re hiring a professional voice-over artist, check their experience; check how much variety there is in the way they can use their voice; check how they use intonation and pronunciation.
• If you’re going to be doing voice overs regularly, or appear on video, then it’s important to get some training.
• Writing scripts for audio and video is different to writing an article or blog. It’s far less formal. It’s conversational.
• Trying to do a voice over yourself can be a false economy. If you can afford it, get a professional.

On My Desk

• Sarah’s recommendation was this wonderful review of Brand Newsroom by Peter Gearin at Brand Tales.
• Alex recommended this great video by Chris Beatty, with a slightly strange method to find out what your voice sounds like to other people.

Have you heard the one about…

Recently Sarah and Nic were joined by Jeremy Stewart from Launchpad Creative and discussed the life span of a website.

And here’s a discussion about how to succeed at video for social media.

Like what you’ve heard?

Give us a follow on SoundCloud to get the latest episodes.

Or, you can subscribe or leave a review on iTunes.

By | August 2nd, 2017|Categories: Brand Newsroom, Marketing|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on Brand Newsroom 151: How important is a voice over?

Brand Newsroom 150: What is the life span of a website?

Jeremy Stewart of Launchpad Creative joins Nic and Sarah to talk about websites. How often should you update your website? What difference can a refresh make to the effectiveness of your site? And what sorts of things should we be updating all the time?

Here are some key take-outs:

  • Jeremy says a business should now be able to get four to five years out of a website. The often-quoted logic of updating your website every two years is probably too labour-intensive.
  • Sarah says to put less information on your site because people don’t want to read everything about your business anymore. She says to refresh and update your website more often — even if it’s not a total redesign.
  • Most companies are now on their third or fourth version on their website. The first question tends to be “what do we need to do to replace what we’ve got?” As a result, many businesses update and replace their website section by section.
  • Know what you want to say and what your audience wants to know and will engage with before you start designing, but work with a designer from the beginning so you have their input.
  • Use dynamic content to reinforce your authority, keep your website fresh, and keep people engaged.
  • A site needs to be clean, easy to use, and easy to navigate. It’s absolutely vital that the design is responsive to various devices.
  • Someone on your team should be looking at the website analytics once a month, checking your rankings and understanding how your website is performing for you.
  • Understand what the purpose of your website is and make it easy for your audience/customers to use it for that purpose.

Here are the links you might need

On My Desk

Have you heard the one about…

Recently Sarah and Nic took a close look at the benefits of podcasting for business.

And here’s some advice about assembling the best possible communications team for your business, even if your budget is tight.

Like what you’ve heard?

Give us a follow on SoundCloud to get the latest episodes.

 Or, you can subscribe or leave a review on iTunes.

By | July 26th, 2017|Categories: Brand Newsroom, Marketing, Uncategorized|Tags: , , |Comments Off on Brand Newsroom 150: What is the life span of a website?

Brand Newsroom 149: How to succeed at video for social

Nic Hayes and Sarah Mitchell are joined by Lush’s senior producer Ian Bignell for a conversation about how to succeed at producing video for social media.

Every day half a billion people are watching videos on Facebook. More than half of all of us are watching video online every single day. So video for social is clearly an incredible opportunity for brands to get their message out to an audience. And if anyone knows how to get it right, it’s Ian.

Here are some key take-outs:

  • In 2017 video will account for 74 per cent of all web traffic. 55 per cent of people watch video online every day.
  • There isn’t a formula to guarantee success, but if you’re realistic about what you plan to achieve and you put a strategy in place, it can really work for you.
  • Audiences are attracted to videos that shock, educate or entertain. They make for very shareable videos.
  • Video needs to grab people’s attention right up front, otherwise people will scroll past.
  • Optimal video lengths are getting shorter but if it’s really entertaining, people will hang in for the end.
  • Know what action you want the audience to take. You need to know that first, then develop the creative to fit that.
  • Don’t try to sell. If the audience senses you’re selling, they’re gone.
  • Trying to be funny can really fail. Try too hard and it just won’t work. And be careful not to offend. But if it’s really relatable, it can work.

On My Desk

  • Sarah’s recommendation was the #yolocaust video. It’s incredible.
  • Ian recommended AIME Global’s “Cogs” video.
  • And Nic, who didn’t seem to get the message we’re talking about video, has recommended a free photography website called Pixabay.

Here are the links you might need:

Have you heard the one about…

Here’s a conversation about how good design can really sell content.

And if you fancy hearing Sarah go off on a rant, here’s a great podcast about drip email marketing techniques.

Like what you’ve heard?

Give us a follow on SoundCloud to get the latest episodes.

Or, you can subscribe or leave a review on iTunes.

 

By | July 19th, 2017|Categories: Brand Newsroom, Marketing|Tags: , |Comments Off on Brand Newsroom 149: How to succeed at video for social

Brand Newsroom 148: Should I start a podcast?

The Brand Newsroom team gets a bit introspective today. They’re talking about podcasting and whether it’s a worthwhile part of the marketing mix for your small business. This is episode 148 of Brand Newsroom and the team has learnt a thing or two along the way. So let’s take a look at the challenges, highlights, pitfalls and benefits of putting a podcast together.

Here are some key take-outs:

  • Podcasting is still very new, but it’s becoming incredibly popular. In the US, podcast listening grew 23 per cent between 2015 and 2016 and 21 per cent of Americans ages 12 and up will have listened to a podcast in the past month. The podcast audience is 57 million Americans in total. In Australia 15 per cent of Australian marketers are using podcasts as part of their content marketing mix.
  • Podcasting is the only sort of content you can consume while you’re doing something else, so it’s a great opportunity to reach an audience at a time when there’s no other form of content they could consume — like when they’re walking the dog.
  • Podcasting has opened a lot of doors for the BNR team. Nic now has mainstream media commitments, particularly in radio — which demonstrates the value in it for business owners like him.
  • Podcasts create evergreen content. In the case of Brand Newsroom we know that about half our listens each week are old episodes — people will go right back and listen to it from the beginning.
  • The secret is consistency. Most podcasts fail because they’re not disciplined enough. People get to six or seven episodes and give up. You have to keep going!
  • Accessibility for podcasts is getting easier. You can listen to podcasts in many new cars now, for example — that’s opening podcasts up to a potential audience the size of radio.
  • Your audience could well be niche. It doesn’t matter if it’s a small audience if your listeners find the content hyper-relevant.
  • Audiences grow. It takes time.
  • You don’t need lots of audio production. The important thing is to have a great and engaging conversation. It has to sound authentic, too — not manufactured.

Here are the links you might need:

On My Desk

Have you heard the one about…

Recently James, Sarah and Nic took a close look at leadership.

And here’s a discussion about how to assemble the best possible communications team.

Like what you’ve heard?

Give us a follow on SoundCloud to get the latest episodes.

 Or, you can subscribe or leave a review on iTunes.

By | July 12th, 2017|Categories: Brand Newsroom, Marketing|Tags: , |Comments Off on Brand Newsroom 148: Should I start a podcast?